The Next Age of Discovery

Ancient Text

Will this coming decade be known as the age of (re)discovery? It just might. The Information Age continues to march on in new and exciting ways with the help of technology. This Wall Street Journal article discusses how researchers are finding incredible new finds in historic archives across the world. Some of the works they have uncovered include never-before-seen versions of the Christian Gospels, fragments of Greek poetry and commentaries on Aristotle.

Improved technology is allowing researchers to scan ancient texts that were once unreadable — blackened in fires or by chemical erosion, painted over or simply too fragile to unroll. Now, scholars are studying these works with X-ray fluorescence, multispectral imaging used by NASA to photograph Mars and CAT scans used by medical technicians.

Read more from the Wall Street Journal

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About repplinger

John has served as a Reference Librarian at Willamette University since 2002. He is the liaison to the Science Departments, and is responsible for maintaining the collections related to the life & physical sciences. His research interests range over the entire spectrum of libraries and information sciences, but includes: - Google and its influence on information & society - The Internet's influence on information seeking & sharing behaviors - Trends of scholarly communication - Electronic learning environments - Traditional pedagogy - GIS use in academic libraries

Posted on May 14, 2009, in Libraries, Technology and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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