Books in the House = Smart Kids

The Chronicle of Higher Education highlighted an article that was recently released about the correlation between a child’s education and their access to books.  Essentially, the international study (performed in 27 nations) found that children who grow up with books in their house are much more likely to be educated (3 years of more education on average) and graduate from college (20% more likely).  The study also indicates that while a child’s parents education matters, it does not matter as much as having access to books at home.

Thus it seems that scholarly culture, and the taste for books that it brings, flows from generation to generation largely of its own accord, little affected by education, occupational status, or other aspects of class … Parents give their infants toy books to play with in the bath; read stories to little children at bed-time; give books as presents to older children; talk, explain, imagine, fantasize, and play with words unceasingly. Their children get a taste for all this, learn the words, master the skills, buy the books. And that pays off handsomely in schools.

The article abstract can be read here (order it though your local library).  The authors of the article are M.D.R. Evans, Jonathan Kelley, Joanna Sikorac, and Donald J. Treimand.

Advertisements

About repplinger

John has served as a Reference Librarian at Willamette University since 2002. He is the liaison to the Science Departments, and is responsible for maintaining the collections related to the life & physical sciences. His research interests range over the entire spectrum of libraries and information sciences, but includes: - Google and its influence on information & society - The Internet's influence on information seeking & sharing behaviors - Trends of scholarly communication - Electronic learning environments - Traditional pedagogy - GIS use in academic libraries

Posted on May 21, 2010, in Education, Libraries and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: