Pew Report: State of Online Video

Source: Pew Internet & American Life Project New Email Alert

Today’s report comes from the Pew Research Center, by Kristen Purcell.

Seven in ten adult internet users (69%) have used the internet to watch or download video. That represents 52% of all adults in the United States.

Moreover, video creation has now become a notable feature of online life. One in seven adult internet users (14%) have uploaded a video to the internet.

“We are seeing a surge in online video watching that is driven by a combination of broadband access, the increasing use of social networking sites, and the popularity of video-sharing sites,” explains Kristen Purcell, Associate Director for Research and author of the report. “To tap into these trends, untold numbers of websites now showcase online video as part of their content.”

Driven by the popularity of online video among 18-29 year-olds, there have been dramatic increases since 2007 in the number of American adults watching:
  • Comedy or humorous videos, rising in viewership from 31% of adult internet users in 2007 to 50% of adult internet users in the current survey
  • Educational videos, rising in viewership from 22% to 38% of adult internet users
  • Movies or TV show videos, rising in viewership from 16% to 32% of adult internet users
  • Political videos, rising in viewership from 15% to 30% of adult internet users
On the other side of the camera, video creation has now become a notable feature of online life. One in seven adult internet users (14%) have uploaded a video to the internet, almost double the 8% who were uploading video in 2007. Home video is far and away the most popular content posted online, shared by 62% of video uploaders. And uploaders are just as likely to share video on social networking sites like Facebook (52% do this) as they are on more specialized video-sharing sites like YouTube (49% do this).

Read the full report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/State-of-Online-Video.aspx

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About repplinger

John has served as a Reference Librarian at Willamette University since 2002. He is the liaison to the Science Departments, and is responsible for maintaining the collections related to the life & physical sciences. His research interests range over the entire spectrum of libraries and information sciences, but includes: - Google and its influence on information & society - The Internet's influence on information seeking & sharing behaviors - Trends of scholarly communication - Electronic learning environments - Traditional pedagogy - GIS use in academic libraries

Posted on June 3, 2010, in Technology and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I think you will find the following of interest and useful for understanding aspects of online video:

    Watching YouTube: Extraordinary Videos by Ordinary People (University of Toronto Press, 2010).

    Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Home Movies in a Global Village
    2. The Home and Family on YouTube
    3. Video Diaries: The Real You in YouTube
    4. Women of the ‘Tube
    5. The YouTube Community
    6. The YouTube Wars: Elections, Religion, and Armed Conflict
    7. The Post-television Audience
    Conclusion

    Catalogue Copy

    In Watching YouTube, Michael Strangelove provides a broad overview of the world of amateur online videos and the people who make them. Dr. Strangelove, the Governor General Literary Award-nominated author that Wired Magazine called a ‘guru of Internet advertising,’ describes how online digital video is both similar to and different from traditional home-movie-making and argues that we are moving into a post-television era characterized by mass participation.

    Strangelove draws from television, film, cultural, and media studies to help define an entirely new field of research. Online practices of representation, confessional video diaries, and debates over elections, religion, and armed conflicts make up the bulk of this groundbreaking study, which is supplemented by an online blog at Strangelove.com/blog. An innovative and timely study, Watching YouTube raises questions about the future of cultural memory, identity, politics, warfare, and family life when everyday representational practices are altered by four billion cameras in the hands of ordinary people.

    Michael Strangelove is an adjunct professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Ottawa.

  1. Pingback: Pew Report: State of Online Video (via Library Shop Talk) « Chicago Mac/PC Support

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